Serendipity

As professional guides, we often do the same tours several times a week. But by the nature of an ever-changing city, each time is a little different. Different customers have personalities & interests, and can create different energies & directions for each tour. Different days bring something new.

Sometimes, you even get a little extra on a familiar tour. These occasions are a treat for both guide and guest. I had a few such occasions these past few weeks (I must've earned some karma recently).

The first was during a street art tour in Brooklyn I'd been hired to do, earlier this week. I was showing the customers a piece by local street artist David Hollier. Then, from across the street, I saw a woman on a stoop, standing near a man, waving frantically at me. "Do you want to talk to him?", she asked. I didn't understand at first. We walked across the street to hear better what she was saying, when we realized that the man with her was David Hollier. He was generous, spending several minutes with us, explaining his piece, his role in the Bushwick street art community, and his larger ambitions for the future.

For the customers, this was an exciting (and rare) chance to put a face to the art world I was introducing them to.

A piece by David Hollier, Brooklyn in 2014.

A piece by David Hollier, Brooklyn in 2014.

Another occasion was on February 13, the day after Abraham Lincoln's birthday. I was doing my full-day Manhattan tour. As we entered the World Trade Center transportation hub early on, we encountered a group of children, surrounded by photographers, reciting the Gettysburg Address. (I explained to my foreign customers memorizing & reciting this address is a ritual most American school children do)... It turned out that this was a group of fourth-graders from Packer Collegiate Institute on a school trip. It was a delight to watch, and had the whole Oculus buzzing with energy on a chilly morning.

Honest abes

Honest abes

Another serendipitous event occurred during my afternoon tour of Central Park just today. As we walked around the Pond on the lower end of the park, I explained about the Hallett Nature Sanctuary, a 3.5-acre gated aviary preserve, which is the only part of the park not regularly open to the public. As we rounded the corner, we found the gates open. The park was having one of their rare open hours for this quiet haven. The customers, and myself, were delighted to have the opportunity to wander around an unpaved part of Central Park that even most locals have not (yet) set foot in.

I personally find the Central Park tour above others to be one that I enjoy, no matter how many times I do it. Experiencing the park vicariously for the first time through guests is a treat. But special surprises like this make it an even more memorable experience.

(My photos from a previous venture inside the sanctuary here.)

I'm even more excited to see what surprises await in the week (and month!) ahead.